AASA New Superintendents E-Journal

October 2010


wallaceFoundation_logoThe Wallace Foundation is an independent, national foundation dedicated to supporting and sharing effective ideas and practices that expand learning and enrichment opportunities for all people. Its three current objectives are: strengthening education leadership to improve student achievement, enhancing out-of-school learning opportunities, and expanding participation in arts and culture. For research and other resources on education leadership, visit the Knowledge Center.


 

Contents

Getting Clear About Directions by Tapping Into School Board Values
By Jack Dale, Superintendent, Fairfax County Public Schools
Polarizing forces in decision-making processes are often rooted in values each of the sides holds dear. Uncovering and discussing those issues is a productive way to move forward.

Strategies To Keep You and the Board Focused on Evaluation
By Jack Dale, Superintendent, Fairfax County Public Schools
The goal for your year-end evaluation should be dialogue and conversation between the board and the superintendent.

Teamwork and Role Delineation – The Ultimate Challenges
By Jack Dale, Superintendent, Fairfax County Public Schools
The role of the school board as watchdog critically diminishes the more powerful board role as the Governance Team working with the Strategy Team and Instructional Team to advance the district to excellence.

Getting Clear About Directions
Linda J. Dawson and Randy Quinn, The Aspen Group International, LLC
Establish the values and understanding of how you, the superintendent, will be given and receive direction from the board. This understanding will save headaches, and maybe your job!

Superintendent Evaluation: A Travesty that Need Not Be
Linda J. Dawson and Randy Quinn, The Aspen Group International, LLC
Superintendents shudder to think about them. School boards dread them. Many avoid them. Nobody looks forward to them. The superintendent evaluation can be a better experience by establishing a process that includes clear expectations.

Teamwork: Redefined
Linda J. Dawson and Randy Quinn, The Aspen Group International, LLC
Good teamwork does not mean that both parties make the same decision. In fact, it means the opposite: good teamwork means that each party plays different, but complementary, roles. For a school board and its superintendent to begin thinking of teamwork in such a fashion, they first must be willing to give up some things in order to gain some things.