The Total Child

EQUITY SERIES: Highline Public Schools #RethinkDisicpline and Out of School Supensions

(School Discipline , On The Road, National Awareness, Equity Series) Permanent link

The following is a guest post by AASA member, Susan Enfield, Superintendent of Highline Public Schools (WA), who attended the AASA/CDF Summit on School Discipline in October 2016.Watch this video, from the Summit, where Superintendent Enfield discusses how suspension should be used as a last resort in school discipline. 

 Enfield
  Watch The Video

During the 2011-12 school year, Highline Public Schools out-of-school suspended or expelled students 2107 times. The most common offense? Defiance. As the district’s new superintendent I knew we had to take action. Fortunately, our staff, school board and community were ready to do just that, so as part of our strategic planning process in 2012-13 we identified six bold goals worthy of our students. One of those was the elimination of out-school-suspensions and expulsions except when critical for staff and student safety which put us on our path to rethinking school discipline in Highline.

 While there is ample research that points to why out-of-school suspension is not a successful intervention or deterrent when it comes to student behavior, what was even more compelling for us were our own students. When asked, they told us that suspension simply didn’t work. Furthermore, we knew from our own data that even one out-of-school suspension increased the likelihood that a student would ultimately drop out, meaning that loss of time in school potentially meant the loss of a high school diploma.

Knowing we had to find ways to get to the root cause of a student’s behavior rather than simply punishing them for it, we invested in Re-engagement Specialists at each of our middle and high schools to lead the development of alternatives to suspension that would keep students in school, while also providing appropriate consequences for their actions and needed interventions and support. As with any new strategy, we have experienced both successes and failures; this is paradigm-shifting work that is not without its criticism or controversy. It is, however, the right thing to do for our students. We have learned that communicating, constantly, with our families and community is essential so we continue to get better at telling our story, an example of which you can see in this video.

Our promise in Highline Public Schools is to ensure that every student is known by name, strength and need and graduates prepared for college, career and citizenship. To deliver on this promise we are committed to keeping our students in school and creating a culture where staff and students alike feel safe, supported and challenged.

New School Wellness Resources for the New Year

(Coordinated School Health, Healthy Eating and Active Living , National Awareness) Permanent link

The following is a guest post from Cheryl Jackson Lewis, Director, Nutrition, Education, Training, and Technical Assistance Division, Child Nutrition Programs, Food and Nutrition Service. 

 Toolkit Header

Have you set any goals for health and wellness in 2017? There are many ways superintendents can help schools create and cultivate a culture of academic success and wellness. District leaders across the country are championing Local School Wellness Policies, with an understanding that kids with healthier eating patterns and enough physical activity tend to have better grades; remember what was taught in class; behave better in class; and miss less school time. A Local School Wellness Policy is a written document that guides school district’s efforts to establish a school environment that promotes students’ health, well-being, and ability to learn. Superintendents play a critical role in helping children have healthy places to learn; and it’s easier than ever to bring everyone together on this important issue.

The Healthy Hunger Free Kids Act of 2010 added new provisions for the implementation, evaluation, and public involvement and reporting on the progress of Local School Wellness Policies. The Local School Wellness Policy final rule, published July 21, 2016, requires schools to engage parents, students, and community members in the annual development and assessment of local school wellness policies. It’s important for everyone to be a part of this process so the wellness policy is representative of the community and student’s needs. Local educational agencies must fully comply with the requirements of the final rule by June 30, 2017.

 School Wellness Champion
 Parents, school staff and administrators, and community members work together to develop the Local School Wellness Policy and put it into action.

The United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Team Nutrition initiative provides a free Local Wellness Policy Outreach Toolkit that superintendents, school wellness leaders, and schools can customize to communicate information about their Local School Wellness Policy to parents, principals, and other school staff. The kit includes:

  •  A letter to the wellness coordinator;
  • Sample letter to school principals;
  • Informational flyers, in English and Spanish;
  • Presentations for parents and school staff;
  • Sample newsletter article; and
  • Social media posts and graphics.

 The free Local Wellness Policy Outreach Toolkit is available at: https://www.fns.usda.gov/tn/local-school-wellness-policy-outreach-toolkit.

Parents and school staff are not always aware of the Local School Wellness Policy and how it is being put into action. These tools can help and may be customized to reflect information specific to the school/school district’s policy. Additional Local Schools Wellness Policy resources on creating, implementing, and evaluating school wellness policies are available at Team Nutrition’s Web site: https://www.fns.usda.gov/tn/local-school-wellness-policy.

January is a great time to reflect on how to further your efforts to engage parents, school staff and the community in school wellness efforts that support academic performance and health. Start with these ready resources and put a plan into action that works for your schools.  

 school garden

 Nutrition education and promotion are part of a Local School Wellness Policy.