The Total Child

'13 Reasons Why' Discussion Resource Library for Educators and Parents

(Coordinated School Health, National Awareness, Student Support Services) Permanent link

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The new Netflix series, 13 Reasons Why, based on 2007 the young adult novel of the same name, revolves around a 17 year old girl, Hannah Baker, who commits suicide. She leaves behind audio recordings to 13 people- 12 students and one school counselor- who she perceives as playing a role in why she killed herself.

 Due to the realistic and graphic depictions of – among other topics-- bullying, rape and the protagonist’s suicide in the show, AASA compiled a resource library for parents and educators on how to talk to youth about the issues conveyed on the show.

 As the National Association of School Psychologists states , “ this is particularly important for adolescents who are isolated, struggling or vulnerable to suggestive images and storylines,” and it is vital to reinforce the message that “suicide is not the solution to problems and help is available.”

The following are the resources we have compiled as of Friday April 28, 2017. We will update the resource library on an ongoing basis on the following page: http://aasa.org/13ReasonsWhyResources.aspx 

Staff Contact

 Kayla Jackson, Project Director
703-875-0725
kjackson@aasa.org

 Resource Library

  •  National Association of School Psychologists. "'13 Reasons Why' Netflix Series: Considerations for Educators"
    •  This resource includes cautions related to the show, guidance for families and educators in recognizing the signs related to youth suicide, safe messaging when talking to students , and additional websites, fact sheets and books to reference on this topic.
     
  •  Child Mind Institute. "Why Talk to Kids About '13 Reasons Why.'" A blog post by Peter Faustino, PsyD, who is a school psychologist in the Bedford Central School District (NY) and a member of the Board of Directors of the National Association of School Psychologists.
  •  The Jed Foundation and SAVE. "13 Reasons Why: Talking Points for Viewing & Discussing the Netflix Series"
    •  Talking points , available in both English and Spanish, to assist parents, teachers and other educators in talking to youth about suicide as it relates to the situational drama that unfolds in '13 Reasons Why.' 
     

Do you want to offer school meals at no cost to all students?

(Alternative School Breakfast , National Awareness, Student Support Services) Permanent link

Guest Post by Alison Maurice, MSW, child nutrition policy analyst at the Food Research & Action Center.

FRAC will co-host a webinar with AASA and the National Rural Education Association on May 8th at 1pm EST on the Community Eligibility Provision. Learn more and Register.  
 

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Community Eligibility Provision is a powerful tool for high-need schools to provide breakfast and lunch at no charge to all students. Community eligibility reduces administrative paperwork for schools and increases school meal participation and benefits the entire community —students, families, school nutrition staff and administrators.

Why should I consider community eligibility for my school district? 

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 Educators know that in order for children to learn, they must be well-nourished. Schools play an important role in ensuring students have access to healthy meals. That is why community eligibility continues to grow in popularity among high-need school districts. Community eligibility has been successful at increasing school breakfast and lunch participation, so more students experience the positive educational outcomes that are linked to participating in school meals. In the current school year, nearly 10 million children in over 20,000 schools and 3,500 school districts are being offered breakfast and lunch at no charge through the community eligibility program.

What are the benefits of community eligibility? 

 School districts participating in community eligibility benefit from: 

  •  less administrative work. School administrators no longer need to collect and verify school meal applications and can focus more resources on providing nutritious meals for students;
  •  increased participation in the school breakfast and lunch programs. In initial pilot states, community eligibility increased breakfast participation by 9.4 percent and increased lunch participation by 5.2 percent;
  •  improved financial viability of school nutrition programs. When community eligibility becomes available at a school, school meal participation increases, which can improve school nutrition finances; and
  •  the elimination of unpaid meal fees. This means schools no longer need to collect money from families or find available funds for the meals that go unpaid by students.

 Additionally, by offering meals at no charge to all students, community eligibility makes it easier for schools to leverage innovative school breakfast service models, such as breakfast in the classroom, “grab and go” breakfast, and second chance breakfast. Traditional school breakfast programs that operate before the school day begins must compete with hectic morning schedules and late bus arrivals. Rather, breakfast after the bell service models integrate breakfast into the school day, allowing more children to start the day ready to learn. 

How does community eligibility work? 

 Community eligibility allows high-need school districts and schools to offer breakfast and lunch at no charge to all students, while eliminating the school meal application process. Any school district, group of schools in a district, or individual school with 40 percent or more “identified students” — children who are certified for free meals without submitting a school meal application — can choose to participate in community eligibility.

Identified Students Include:

  • children who live in households that receive assistance from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly known as food stamps); Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF); or the Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations (FDPIR), and in some states, Medicaid benefits; and
  •  children who are homeless, migrant, enrolled in Head Start, or in foster care.

 How will my schools get reimbursed?

Once a school, group of schools, or school district establishes its identified student percentage (ISP), the ISP is multiplied by 1.6 to determine the percentage of meals reimbursed at the free reimbursement rate (capped at 100 percent). The remainder is reimbursed at the paid rate. This percentage is locked in for four years, unless the ISP goes up, in which case it would be adjusted to reflect the increase. The U.S. Department of Agriculture provides a “Community Eligibility Provision Estimator ” tool to help school districts determine if community eligibility makes financial sense. There is a lot of flexibility in how schools are grouped to determine the ISP, allowing districts to group schools to ensure financial viability.

 

Identified Student Percentage (ISP)

Meals Reimbursed at the Free Rate

Meals Reimbursed at the Paid Rate

40%

64%

36%

45%

72%

28%

50%

80%

20%

55%

88%

12%

60%

96%

4%

65%

100%

0%


 What can I do right now?

 Start planning for the 2017–2018 school year today. Find out which school districts and schools in your state have implemented community eligibility or were eligible during the 2016–2017 school year using FRAC’s Community Eligibility Database .

 Check out these resources to learn more about community eligibility:

 By adopting community eligibility, you can increase participation in school breakfast and lunch, ensuring your students the nutrition needed to succeed in school.

 Is there a deadline for my school district to apply for community eligibility?

On May 1, 2017, your state’s education agencies will publish a list of schools and school districts that qualify for community eligibility. Review the list to see which of your schools qualify for the 2017–2018 school year.

The deadline to apply to use community eligibility in the 2017–2018 school year is June 30, 2017.

 For more information on community eligibility, reach out to Alison Maurice , child nutrition policy analyst at the Food Research & Action Center .

EQUITY SERIES: Many Miles to go on the Equity Journey

(Equity Series) Permanent link

The following is a guest cross-post by Jimmy Minichello, AASA's Director of Communications and Marketing. The original post is on the AASA website homepage under Top News

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The day Matthew Utterback was named AASA’s 2017 National Superintendent of the Year, he said, “I don’t think there is anything more important in our work than to honor a student’s history, culture and identity, and affirm who they are in our public school systems.”  

Equity is a key issue for Utterback, the superintendent of Oregon’s North Clackamas School District. That was the topic of conversation when he appeared on Education Talk Radio earlier this week.

“It’s really been a wonderful opportunity for us to share some of the good work that’s been happening in our school district for the last four or five years,” said Utterback, who leads a district comprised of 17,000 students. “A really concentrated effort on equity which we’re finding has had pretty dramatic influence on improving student achievement.”

Accompanying Utterback on the program was Bryan Joffe, AASA’s project director for the organization’s Children’s Programs Department.

“Equity is really about all ensuring that all children have great access to a quality education,” said Joffe. “It’s really trying to change what we have in this country—that demographics is a (constant) predictor of student success. That has to change.”

At North Clackamas Schools, Utterback said 33 percent of the student population are students of color, with 40 percent on free and reduced lunch. “Our staff has remained traditionally White. There is a disconnect for many of our students. They don’t see themselves reflected in the curriculum and they don’t see themselves on our staff. Given that, how do we, as a school system, respond to that disconnect. That has been our focus in North Clackamas.”

Utterback added, “Our job then as educators is how do we bring in the culture, history, experiences of our students into our school system? How do we affirm students for who they are and what they’re bringing to us? How does that reflect into our curriculum and how does that reflect itself into our teaching strategies and our practices?”

Joffe affirmed that through various initiatives administered by AASA’s Children’s Programs, the work to address these critical issues is underway. These initiatives include School Breakfast, School Discipline and Coordinated School Health.

“It shouldn’t be the district (with high concentrations of) poverty also has low achievement,” he said. “It’s all about trying to give children an equal and fair chance.”

Although great strides are underway at North Clackamas Schools, Utterback said much more work needs to be done. “We still have many miles to go in this journey.”

Asked about being named the 2017 National Superintendent of the Year, Utterback said it’s an “amazing opportunity to share our stories in our work. We do have a story to share. I’m excited to represent AASA and superintendents across the country and bring to life the amazing work that public schools bring to this country every day.”

 Click here to listen to the program.