CDC Revises COVID Masking Guidance for Schools, Clarifies Mask Mandate on Buses

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CDC Revises COVID Masking Guidance for Schools, Clarifies Mask Mandate on Buses

In an announcement out this afternoon, the CDC announced revised guidance that eases mask guidance for upwards of 70% of the population. As an overview, areas with a high COVID-19 community level (about 30% of the US population), masks would still be recommended. For the remaining 70% of communities, areas with low or medium community level, masks are no longer recommended for the general public.

Notable to the guidance, schools are no longer considered in a unique category when it comes to masking recommendations. That is, under the new guidelines, universal masking in schools is now only recommended in areas with a high level.  

The other big point of information is specific to masking on buses: in the revised guidance, CDC clarifies that the TSA mask mandate for public transportation does not apply to public or private schools, including early care and education/child care programs. CDC is making this change to align with updated guidance that no longer recommends universal indoor mask wearing in K-12 schools and early education settings in areas with a low or medium COVID-19 Community Level. School systems at their discretion may choose to require that people wear masks on buses or vans.

CDC Updates COVID-19 Vaccination Interval Guidance and Compiled School Resources

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CDC Updates COVID-19 Vaccination Interval Guidance and Compiled School Resources

On February 24, the CDC updated its COVID-19 vaccination guidance with additional information to help vaccine providers determine the optimal interval between the first and second dose of an mRNA vaccine series, based on the individual patient. This information has been shared with CDC’s partners including all 64 jurisdictions and local health departments.

The CDC also pulled together a compiled list of COVID-19 Prevention Resources and Guidance for Schools that includes the latest CDC guidance, test to stay talking points and program information, resources from partners, and links to three recent webinars. The document titled “School Resources” includes all relevant links for CDC resources and other resources from CDC partners. Please feel free to share the following with your districts:

 

CALL-TO- ACTION: Tell Congress to Extend USDA’s Waiver Authority

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CALL-TO- ACTION: Tell Congress to Extend USDA’s Waiver Authority

Early in the pandemic, Congress gave the USDA the authority to issue child nutrition waivers so that schools and local organizations could adapt their meal programs and provide meals to children in ways that work best for their communities. However, USDA’s waiver authority is currently set to expire on June 30, meaning it will not be able to renew any of the existing waivers for the summer or SY22-23. Congress must extend this authority to maintain the critical flexibilities that districts need to ensure children still have access to school meals and to address the ongoing challenges caused by the supply chain disruptions.

Contact your members of Congress today and urge them to extend USDA’s waiver authority! It’s easy using the AASA AdvocacyApp:

1. Go to the Documents section of the app for the text of the email to send to your members of Congress.

2. Cut/paste the email and send to your members of Congress. To find the email addresses of your members go to the “Congressional Outreach” section of the app and click on the email listed for the education staffer. Consider personalizing your outreach to that person with the text and include any specific experiences you are having that detail why the waivers are critical for your district.  

CISA School Safety Task Force releases the K-12 School Security Guide Suite

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CISA School Safety Task Force releases the K-12 School Security Guide Suite

On February 22, the the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) School Safety Task Force released the K-12 School Security Guide Suite, a set of products designed to inform safety and physical security planning for the range of kindergarten through grade 12 (K-12) schools across the United States. 

Developed in partnership with the RAND Corporation, the K-12 School Security Guide Suite is comprised of the CISA K-12 School Security Guide (3rd Edition) and accompanying School Security Assessment Tool (SSAT). The Guide and SSAT provide a comprehensive doctrine and methodology to assist schools in conducting more robust vulnerability assessments and implementing layered physical security elements across K–12 districts and campuses. Both products are available on CISA.gov and are designed to support school communities in strengthening their protection and mitigation capabilities against the range of targeted violence and crime-related threats they might face.

Dr. David Mussington, executive director of CISA, developed this guide to demonstrate "...how taking a systems-based approach to school physical security planning can help schools create safe and secure learning environments – without requiring school staff to become security experts or compromising the broader educational mission."

The guide suite includes systems-based approaches to layered school security such as planning processes with elements and strategies of security and well as creating a physical grounds perimeter with building exterior and interior layers for systems. These layers are meant to detect, delay and respond to threats. One of the key themes stressed in the guide suite is that these approaches are not one size fits all and may be adjusted for each unique school system. 

The release of the K-12 School Security Guide Suite marks an important milestone in CISA’s continued efforts to advance safe, secure, and resilient schools, and to keep our Nation’s students safe. We hope you find these products to be useful, actionable, and valuable in supporting your school safety efforts, while at the same time preserving the broader educational mission of your institutions.

Check out the guide suite as well as the K-12 School Security Assessment Tools (with guides!) here.

USED Releases Final Non-Regulatory Guidance on Within-District Allocations under Title I, Part A (Title I) of the ESEA

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USED Releases Final Non-Regulatory Guidance on Within-District Allocations under Title I, Part A (Title I) of the ESEA

On February 14, the U.S. Department of Education (USED) released final non-regulatory guidance on within-district allocations under Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA). It addresses required and authorized reservations of Title I funds by a local educational agency (LEA) and then outlines how an LEA, with the Title I funds that remain after the reservations, identifies eligible Title I school attendance areas and allocates Title I funds to public schools.

USED created the document to enable users to access information on within-district Title I allocations in a single document rather than in multiple documents.

WEBINAR RECORDING: Planting Seeds During Recovery to Grow Your Long-Term Vision

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WEBINAR RECORDING: Planting Seeds During Recovery to Grow Your Long-Term Vision

Earlier this week, AASA hosted the webinar “Making the Most of Your ESSER Funds: Planting Seeds During Recovery to Grow Your Long-Term Vision”. We were pleased to be joined by Peter Finch, superintendent of West Valley (Wash.) School District #208, who shared how his district is aligning its recovery efforts with its work to shift toward the Learning 2025 vision. Additionally, Valerie Truesdale, AASA assistant executive director, gave an overview of the Learning 2025 framework, and Dan Gordon and Ellie Cash of EducationCounsel introduced a self-assessment tool to think through how to continuously improve district ARP ESSER plans. You can access an archive recording of the webinar here and the presentation here.  We are happy to share some related resources:

  • AASA Learning Recovery and Redesign Installments

Visit AASA’s webinars page for more great content, including upcoming and recorded webinars.

AASA, NHSA Urge the Administration to Provide Clear Guidance Regarding Head Start Vaccine Mandate

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AASA, NHSA Urge the Administration to Provide Clear Guidance Regarding Head Start Vaccine Mandate

On February 8, AASA and the National Head Start Association (NHSA) sent a letter to Secretaries Cardona (USED) and Becerra (HHS) asking for clear guidance on the Head Start Interim Final Rule with Comments (IFC) on vaccines and masking to ensure Head Start programs and public school system leaders can continue to operate Head Start programs and ensure that Head Start children and their families safely retain access to critical services.

School districts are essential partners that often directly deliver services to Head Start children and families. They need clarity on how the mandates will apply in locations where the IFC conflicts with state and/or local regulations or guidance in a manner which does not isolate or negatively impact children. Read the full letter here

AASA Responds to OCR Mandatory Civil Rights Data Collection

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AASA Responds to OCR Mandatory Civil Rights Data Collection

Today, AASA posted our response to Office of Civil Rights (OCR) Civil Rights Data Collection for 2021-2022 school year. This data collection will hit districts in January 2023. Currently, districts are reporting data for the 2020-2021 Civil Rights Data Collection. This is the first time OCR has required back-to-back collections. Here is an excerpt of our comments:

"If there was ever a moment in time for the U.S. Department of Education to recognize the hardship of increased data collection it would be now. Instead, by ignoring or simply dismissing the reality of district personnel and their workloads during the third year of a global pandemic, the 2021-2022 collection proposes to increase the CRDC collection by 47.5 percent when compared to the 2020-2021 collection. Moreover, the Department of Education sets a record over the past decade in the number of hours required to comply with the collection. Even if these estimates, while low, are accurate, the burden a decade ago on districts was estimated to be 8.1 hours per elementary school and 14.9 hours per secondary school.  For the 2021-2022 collection the burden for elementary schools is estimated to be 13.7 hours per school survey and for secondary schools, the burden is estimated to be 22.6 hours per school survey.

Each year we see enormous shifts in the data that is revised and collected. This year the whiplash in data elements is particularly clear as we have an unprecedented CRDC collection happening in back-to-back years. It is our view that either OCR is required to collect this information because to do so would be to leave it clueless as to whether a student’s civil rights are being infringed upon on a permanent basis (as the student’s civil rights are not immutable) or OCR is collecting considerable amounts of 'nice-to-know' rather than 'need-to-know' data with little regard for the burden these reporting requirements place on LEAs and school personnel. If it is the latter, which AASA suspects, then it is highly questionable to place this burden on district personnel during a pandemic when it comes at the direct cost of removing key instructional staff to perform data collection duties."

You can read our full comments here.

 

AASA Leads Letter on IDEA Funding in FY22, Opposes CR

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AASA Leads Letter on IDEA Funding in FY22, Opposes CR

AASA is proud to be a co-chair of the IDEA Full Funding Coalition. In that role, we were proud to sign on to a letter to Capitol Hill expressing support for the proposed increase to IDEA in FY22, and opposing a year-long CR, as it would eliminate any possibility of a funding increase. You can read the full letter here.  

AASA, NAPT Commend FMCSA for Flexibility in 3rd Party Administration of CDL Tests

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AASA, NAPT Commend FMCSA for Flexibility in 3rd Party Administration of CDL Tests

Earlier today, AASA and NAPT expressed gratitude to the FMCSA for recently released guidance that grants flexibility to allow for 3rd party administration of CDL tests. The joint statement reads:

“On behalf of the National Association for Pupil Transportation and AASA, The School Superintendents Association, I write to express our collective appreciation for FMCSA’s amended regulatory guidance that will allow third party testers to administer the commercial driver’s license (CDL) knowledge test for all classes and endorsements. Our organizations collectively represent the transportation and education professionals responsible for ensuring students arrive safely to school each day. We know that yellow school buses are a critical link in our education system, providing not just the safest way to and from school, but predictability to the school day for students and their families, teachers and school administrators.  Covid-19 circumstances are continuing to impact both schools and pupil transportation operations, exacerbated by a pre-existing national shortage of school bus drivers.  Accordingly, NAPT and AASA are pleased the FMCSA acted expeditiously on still another of our November 2021 requests to consider regulatory flexibility for several commercial driver license (CDL) requirements for drivers.  This latest proposal combines with other actions we believe will provide needed relief for challenging national circumstances while preserving the exemplary safety performance that defines school transportation in the U.S.”

House Introduces Bipartisan Bill to Extend USDA Waiver Authority

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House Introduces Bipartisan Bill to Extend USDA Waiver Authority

On February 7, the bipartisan Keeping School Meals Flexible Act was introduced by Representatives Abigail Spanberger (D-VA), Brian Fitzpatrick (R-PA), Suzanne Bonamici (D-OR) and John Katko (R-NY). The bill would extend USDA’s authority to establish, grant, or extend child nutrition waivers through the upcoming school year, ending on June 30, 2023. All 12 waivers currently in place and USDA’s waiver authority are set to expire on June 30, 2022.

AASA has endorsed the bill and hopes Congress moves swiftly to act on this important issue. The current USDA waivers have given school districts across the country the critical flexibility necessary to continue to provide healthy meals to students, while navigating supply chain issues, school closures, and more. Extending the waivers for the 2022-2023 school year will provide an important safety net to schools as operations gradually return to normal.  

Webinar: Lessons from the Field: Staying in School in Person in 2022- Test to Stay and Other Strategies

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Webinar: Lessons from the Field: Staying in School in Person in 2022- Test to Stay and Other Strategies

The U.S. Department of Education is hosting a webinar series to support educational settings in safely sustaining in-person instruction. The series features lessons learned and best practices from faculty, staff, schools, districts, institutions of higher education, early childhood education providers, and other places of educational instruction, describing approaches to operating during the COVID-19 pandemic.

On behalf of the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Elementary and Secondary Education’s Office of Safe and Supportive Schools, the National Center on Safe Supportive Learning Environments (NCSSLE) invites you to join the next webinar, Staying in School in Person in 2022: Test to Stay and Other Strategies.

Featured speakers and panelists include:

  • Hayley Meadvin: Senior Advisor, Office of the Secretary of Education, U.S. Department of Education
  • Miguella Mark-Carew: Field Epidemiologist, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • Neha Cramer: Guidance and Technical Assistance Lead, STLT Support Task Force, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • Kristine Orr: Superintendent, South Glen Falls School District (NY)
  • Kristen Howard: Epidemiologist, Saratoga County Public Health Services (NY)

The webinar will be held on Wednesday, February 9 at 3 p.m. EST. Register here.

You can find related testing resources from USED for your district here.

 

USDA Releases Transitional Standards Milk, Whole Grains and Sodium - Final Rule

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USDA Releases Transitional Standards Milk, Whole Grains and Sodium - Final Rule

On February 4, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced transitional standards on milk, whole grains and sodium that will be in place for School Years 2022-2023 and 2023-2024.

The transitional standards include:

  • Allowing local operators of the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and School Breakfast Program (SBP) to offer flavored, low-fat milk (1 percent fat) for students in grades K through 12 and for sale as a competitive beverage.
  • Beginning in SY 2022-2023, at least 80 percent of the weekly grains in the school lunch and breakfast menus must be whole grain-rich.
  • Establishes Sodium Target 1 as the sodium limit for school lunch and breakfast in SY2022-2023. For SY2023-2024, schools must meet Sodium Target 1A which requires a 10% reduction in sodium for school lunch only.

All other school nutrition standards – including fruit and vegetable requirements and overall calorie ranges – remain the same as the 2012 standards. More details here.

These transitional standards are in place while USDA works with stakeholders to strengthen meal standards through a new rulemaking for the longer term. The longer-term standards will be based on a comprehensive review of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2020-2025 and effective starting in school year 2024-2025.

While we are pleased to see continued flexibility for school meal programs, we anticipate the longer- term standards will include more stringent requirements that will result in reduced participation in school meal programs and unnecessary food waste. AASA recognizes the importance of promoting healthy eating habits around sodium, enriched whole grains, and dairy intake, but it is important to acknowledge that healthy meals are only healthy if students eat them.

Some Background: AASA opposed the reauthorization of the Healthy and Hunger Free Kids Act largely because while the bill included an increased meal reimbursement rate, LEAs had to adopt the higher meal standards to get the reimbursement, and all analyses demonstrated that adopting the higher nutritional regulations cost at least nearly double the proposed increase, setting schools up to be in the red. The bill became law, though, and AASA and other organizations worked with the administration, Congress and the USDA to craft implementation documents (including guidance and regulations) that brought more levity to the proposal, including the more common-sense requirements around whole grain, milk fat, and sodium. You’ll recall that the HHFKA required 100% whole grains, only allowed for the sale of flavored non-fat milk and included a sodium target level 3. Left to implement these standards, AASA worked with USDA and Congress to make them manageable for districts and were able to get reasonable flexibilities, which remained in effect through the pandemic. Specific to today’s announcement, we had recommended 50% whole grain, maintaining Sodium Target 1 and allowing for the sale of 1% flavored milk. We are pleased to see the majority of our asks included in these transitional standards.

NOTE: Due to COVID-19, USDA has provided various flexibilities in the school meal programs to ensure schools could continue to serve meals during the public health emergency and related supply chain disruptions. USDA has encouraged schools to meet the meal standards as closely as possible, but schools are not being penalized if they are unable to fully meet the requirements at this time. 

All Things Advocacy and Governance at NCE

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All Things Advocacy and Governance at NCE

The AASA Advocacy Team is excited for the 2022 National Conference on Education in Nashville! Here’s what we have planned:

Wednesday, February 15

Governing Board Meeting

9:00a.m. ET, Location: Broadway EF

Thursday, February 16

A Discussion on Monitoring Civil Rights Compliance in Districts

10:15—11:15a.m. ET, Location: Room 205B

Suzanne Goldberg, the Deputy Assistant Secretary for the Office of Civil Rights, will present on recent federal K-12 civil rights actions by the U.S. Department of Education. After the presentation, participants will have a chance to hear about and discuss the recent changes to the Civil Rights Data Collection, which Suzanne leads. This is a great opportunity for superintendents to engage directly with key staff at the U.S. Department of Education about a variety of civil rights issues impacting students and district leaders.

Federal Relations Luncheon: The Fight for the Future of Public EducationAdditional ticket required  

12:00—1:30p.m. ET, Location: Room 104, Convention Center

Derek W. Black, a legal scholar and author of Schoolhouse Burning: Public Education and the Assault on American Democracy, will discuss how today's current schooling trends—the declining commitment to properly fund public education and the well-financed political agenda to expand vouchers and undermine the operations of public schools—threatens not just public education but American democracy itself.

Taking Stock of ESSER Spending

3:00—4:00p.m. ET, Location: Room 204, Convention Center  

In this session Dr. Marguerite Roza, Director of Edunomics Lab at Georgetown University, will share the six potential mistakes districts may be making right now, opportunities and pitfalls reporting ESSER spending, and how to demonstrate money is well spent in your district.

Friday, February 18

An Update on Federal Regulations, Guidance and Court Cases

8:00—9:00a.m. ET, Location: Room 204

The top education legal team in the country will walk you through the latest Supreme Court cases impacting education and how they impact your districts, as well as the latest federal guidance and regulations you should understand and follow.

President Elect Candidate Forum

11:15a.m.—12:15p.m. ET, Location: Room 204

The candidates for AASA President-Elect will have the opportunity to respond to questions from the chair of the AASA Election Committee as well as members attending the National Conference on Education.

AASA Federal Education Policy Update

12:45—1:45p.m. ET, Location: Room 205A

AASA’s entire Advocacy Team will be presenting the latest and greatest information from Washington, D.C. beginning with funding and legislative updates from Congress and moving on to recent regulations and guidance issued by USED as well as the various federal policy issues percolating at USDA, DOT, EPA and many other federal agencies. This is a must-attend session for those who are concerned about federal education matters and who want to stay engaged with AASA’s advocacy work.

Addressing the Decline of Vaccination Rates of U.S. Students: What Supts Can Do

2:30—3:30p.m. ET, Location: Room 205B

Understand the implications of declines in childhood vaccination rates resulting from the pandemic and how districts can build and sustain cross-institutional partnerships to develop and sustain school and district-based vaccination clinics for students during and beyond the pandemic. Participants will learn the best ways to increase parent and staff understand of lowered student vaccination rates and strategies for promoting parental consent for vaccinations. The session will feature two superintendents who have provided students with vaccination opportunities for years prior to the pandemic and who believe holding school-based vaccination clinics are essential to achieving health and educational equity for students.

Making the Most of your ESSER Funds: Reflecting on your Plans for Recovery and Redesign

3:45—4:45p.m. ET, Location: Room 203

How can districts ensure they are using ESSER funds to meet immediate needs and, at the same time, redesign toward a more student-centered, equity-focused and future-driven approach? Join AASA and EducationCounsel for an introduction to new guidance and resources tailored to this challenge and aligned with AASA’s Learning 2025 framework. Dr. Andi Fourlis, superintendent of Mesa (Ariz.) Public Schools, will share her district’s current approach and plans for continuously improving their recovery and redesign plans. 

Follow the goings-on of the advocacy team and the conference’s policy sessions on the AASA blog and by following @AASAdvocacy and the Advocacy Team: @Noellerson, @SPudelski, @K_Sturdevant and @TaraEThomas1 on Twitter.

The Advocate February 2022: Legislative Limbo- How Low Will It Go?

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The Advocate February 2022: Legislative Limbo- How Low Will It Go?

As we head into February—fresh on the heels of a Punxsutawney Phil who saw his shadow, bringing us six more weeks of winter—we find Congress also looking at an extension, albeit one of the federal budget, which is past due. And the annual appropriations cycle isn’t the only thing in limbo: when it comes to things to watch in Congress this month, it’s a hat trick: annual appropriations, school meal waivers, and Head Start vaccine mandate.

  • Annual Appropriations: Federal fiscal year 2022 (FY22) started on October 1, 2021. FY22 dollars will be in schools for the 2022-23 school year. And while FY22 started on Oct 1, Congress did not complete its funding work on time. When the funding is completed on time, we either get a federal shutdown, or Congress buys itself more time via a continuing resolution, which just extends the timeline and buys Congress more time to complete its funding works. We are in our second CR of FY22, and the current one expires on February 18. In terms of where we stand on FY22 appropriations specifics, the potential, as it relates to education and the things we prioritize, is very good: The President, House and Senate have all proposed budgets that prioritize education and include significant increases for critical formula programs like Title I and IDEA. Democratic majorities remain in both chambers, and while almost everything in this town is currently hyperpolitical and partisan, one thing that can consistently be bipartisan is the annual appropriations work. Where it gets complicated is actually the timing: when we get this far into the fiscal year, it is increasingly likely Congress chooses to do a year-long CR, which would level fund the federal government for the full year. While year-long CRs were a safer thing under the previous administration to help protect against education cuts, we are opposed to a year-long CR in this scenario. A year-long CR would mean level funding, which would mean no increase for Title I and IDEA. We need clear messaging to Capitol Hill to finish the appropriations process in normal order, and to include the proposed education increases. And, as soon as that dust settles, Congress will pivot to the FY23 budget process, which usually kicks off in February.
  • Head Start: We are waiting additional clarify from HHS detailing how Head Start will be impacted by the vaccine mandate for employers.  On November 30, 2021, HHS implemented an interim rule establishing a COVID-19 vaccine and masking mandate for Head Start programs. The masking requirement took effect immediately while the vaccine mandate required Head Start teachers, staff, and contractors working directly with children to be fully vaccinated by Jan. 31, 2022. 24 states challenged the rule, and on January 1, 2022, a federal district judge blocked the vaccine requirement for Head Start employees in the states that signed onto the lawsuit. (AK, AL, AR, AZ, FL, GA, IN, IA, KS, KY, LA, MO, MS, MT, ND, NE, OH, OK, SC, SD, TN, UT, WV, and WY. ) TX filed a separate law suit, meaning that 25 states are exempt from the vaccine mandate in Head Start programs, but the remaining 50 states are subject to the provision. We are awaiting further clarification on what that implementation will look like. AASA is currently partnering with our friends at the National Head Start Association to pen a joint letter asking the administration and Congress to act expeditiously to revise implementation guidance for their vaccine mandate to eliminate conflicts between inter-governmental policies. We’ll post the final letter to the blog once it is delivered!
  • School Meal Flexibilities: AASA is committed to extending the school meal flexibilities in place under COVID through the 2022-23 school year. The current flexibilities last through the 2021-22 school year; anticipating continued disruptions due to COVID, and the fact that child hunger won’t end just because the pandemic may subside or become endemic, it is critical Congress take action to extend the flexibilities, either in an appropriations bill, a revised version of the Build Back Better package, or (less likely) a school meal reauthorization. 

And if those issues don’t capture your attention, or you’re wondering what else we might be working on at the federal level, here’s a quick run down of other policies we are supporting:

  • Extension of ARP Timeline to Support Infrastructure Work: AASA is spearheading an effort—an uphill effort, at that—to push the Congress and administration to extend the timeline on ARP ESSER dollars to support infrastructure projects through September 2026. Read the related op-ed as it appeared in the Washington Post.
  • Regional Calls with USED: AASA is pleased to be working with USED to facilitate ongoing, rotating regional calls for school superintendents to speak directly with USED Secretary Miguel Cardona and Deputy Secretary Cindy Marten. You can check out the anticipated schedule of upcoming calls here.
  • Title I Funding Formula: While this has a next-to-zero chance of getting over the finish line (or anywhere near it) this year, AASA is pleased to be reunited in our effort with Rep. Glenn Thompson (R-PA) to revise and update the Title I funding formula to better target the dollars based on concentration of need.
  • Medicaid Claiming in Schools: We continue to work with the Biden Administration to push them to streamline the paperwork burden schools have to navigate to realize the full funding they’re due for the Medicaid services they provide to students. 

We’ll also be in Nashville this month for the National Conference on Education; join us on Friday February 18 at 12:45 p.m. CT for our in-person advocacy update. We hope to see you there.

 

Regional Calls with USED: A Recap

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Regional Calls with USED: A Recap

This year, AASA is pleased to be working with USED to facilitate ongoing, rotating regional calls for school superintendents to speak directly with USED Secretary Miguel Cardona and Deputy Secretary Cindy Marten. You can check out the anticipated schedule of upcoming calls here. USED followed up with a variety of resources mentioned during the call, that we are happy to share here:

  1. COVID-19 Testing  
  2. Staffing Shortages  
  3. American Rescue Plan (ARP)
    • We encourage you to share the ways you are using ARP funds throughout your school communities. The Department recently launched #ARPStars, a social media campaign highlighting schools, states, and educators – in their own words – doing everything they can to fight COVID-19 and give students, teachers, and families the tools they need to succeed. Check out their first few posts. Share your projects, use the hashtag and they will lift up the posts! 
     

USED Upcoming Regional Calls with Secretary Cardona and Deputy Secretary Cindy Marten for Superintendents

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USED Upcoming Regional Calls with Secretary Cardona and Deputy Secretary Cindy Marten for Superintendents

UPDATED 3/11

We have been working with USED to set up and support a series of regional conversations for public school superintendents with Secretary Cardona and Deputy Secretary Cindy Marten. These calls will be grouped by AASA region, and AASA will email all superintendent and district administrators in each state, ahead of their scheduled call. We are also working with our state affiliates to ensure as robust a dissemination of this information as possible. Feel free to check back to the blog; we’ll be updating the dates/times/state rosters for these calls as they get locked in.

If you don’t see an email with call information ahead of your state call, reach out to Noelle Ellerson Ng (nellerson@aasa.org). 

The tentative schedule for calls is the following:

DATE REGION TIME
     
Friday, March 11 Region 1 & 2 (AZ, CA, CO, HI, NV, NM, UT) 10:00 - 11:00 a.m. HT/12:00 - 1:00 p.m. PT/1:00 - 2:00 p.m. MT
Friday, March 18 Region 2 & 3 (AR, IA, KS, NE, ND, OK, SD, TX) 1:00 - 2:00 MT/2:00 - 3:00 p.m. CT/3:00 - 4:00 p.m. ET
Friday, March 25 Region 6 & 7 (NJ, PA, WV, CT, NY, RI) 3:00 - 4:00 p.m. ET
Friday, April 1 Region 2 (AZ, CO, NM, UT) 1:00 - 2:00 p.m. MT
Friday, April 8 Region 3 (IA, ND, NE, SD) 2:00 - 3:00 p.m. CT
Friday, April 15 Region 5 (NC, TN, SC, VA) 2:00 - 3:00 p.m. CT/3:00 - 4:00 p.m. ET
Friday, April 22 Region 6 (DC, DE, MD) 3:00 - 4:00 p.m. ET
Friday, April 29 Region 7 (MA, ME, NH, VT) 3:00 - 4:00 p.m. ET


The Zoom info will be sent to you prior to the call. We look forward to these calls, and hope you can dial in. 





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