The Total Child

Community of Practice: A District Team Approach to Strengthening Breakfast After the Bell

(Alternative School Breakfast , Healthy Eating and Active Living , Student Support Services) Permanent link

Guest post by Alison Maurice, Child Nutrition Policy Analyst and Megan McDonough, Child Nutrition Summer Intern, Food Research & Action Center (FRAC)

AASA, The School Superintendents Association (AASA) and The Food Research & Action Center (FRAC) partnered to host a webinar featuring three school districts that participate in AASA’s “Feeding Hungry Minds” alternative school breakfast initiative. Since 2011, The Walmart Foundation has supported AASA’s work.  

 SBLogoOct2017

This webinar featured Mountain View School District in California, Spring Independent School District (ISD) in Texas, and Newburgh Enlarged City School District in New York. These school district offers breakfast to their students using breakfast after the bell (BATB) models. The alternative breakfast programs these school districts have built -- with mentorship, technical assistance, and other support from AASA -- exemplify what is possible when school administrators and school nutrition staff join together to ensure students have the morning nutrition they need to be successful in the classroom.

To facilitate engagement of school superintendents and school nutrition directors, AASA established the Community of Practice (CoP) model as an integral part of their work on school breakfast with districts. The CoP brings together superintendents, food service directors, state anti-hunger organizations, and dairy associations to share best practices and problem solve together. The CoP’s structure encourages relationship building for a deeper understanding of participants’ shared vision on children, health and hunger. 

In 2013, Mountain View School District launched a grab and go breakfast program in all 12 of its schools. From 2013 to 2014, the district increased average daily school breakfast participation by 71 percent, with 5 out of 12 schools increasing by more than 100 percent.

“I believe administrative support, and in particular superintendent support, especially when initiating this program is critical,” said Lillian Maldonado French, Superintendent of Mountain View School District. “When folks knew it was something that we were all behind, especially something that the board and I were willing to support, I think folks really came along and tried to make sure that it was a success.” 

Spring ISD launched their district-wide school breakfast program in 2015 that began with eight schools and successfully grew to universal free breakfast by the end of that year. This is a priority for Superintendent Rodney Watson, who meets monthly with the district’s Chief Operating Officer, Director of Child Nutrition, students, and the Texas Department of Agriculture to set benchmarks for the school breakfast program.

Spring ISD’s 26 elementary schools serve breakfast in the classroom (BIC), while the 4 high schools and 2 middle schools use grab and go kiosks to distribute breakfast. Shelly Copeland, Director of Child Nutrition, noted that one of her principals quickly saw improvements in student behavior ,“and we see that on a daily basis—the calmness of the students and the community feel of having breakfast in the classroom.”

Newburgh Enlarged City School District had more than a 100 percent increase in breakfast participation in each of their 14 schools in 2015 when they began providing BIC to their 12,000 students.

“We believe in the research around when a child is hungry, the impact that it will have on student learning,” stated Roberto Padilla, Superintendent of the Newburgh Enlarged City School District. “We [superintendents] are all in this profession because we love children and we want to create conditions whereby they have the optimal opportunity to achieve at the highest level. This is just simply a matter of removing a barrier that could get in that way.”

 Since 2011, AASA has engaged 30 school districts to increase participation in school breakfast to reduce hunger and increase the number of students who are healthy, alert, in school and learning. Learn more about this initiative through two School Governance and Leadership (SG&L) Publications: “Improving Attendance Health and Behavior: Moving Breakfast Out of the Cafeteria (2013)” and “Feeding Hungry Minds: Stories from the Field (2017). Access AASA’s resource library for more information on this initiative.

 Follow this link to access the webinar recording, and use this password: PpUV4P2Y

Celebrating 2018 National School Breakfast Week

(Alternative School Breakfast , Healthy Eating and Active Living , National Awareness, Student Support Services) Permanent link

Since 2011, AASA has engaged 30 school districts in the Alternative School Breakfast Initiative, supported by the Walmart Foundation. This program increases the number of children who eat school breakfast, by taking breakfast out of the cafeteria and into the classroom and hallways through Breakfast in the Classroom, Grab ‘n’ Go, and Second Chance options.

The eight districts in our most recent cohort held activities during National School Breakfast Week to raise awareness of their school breakfast programs. Here are some shining examples.

National Recognition 

Alhambra Unified School District receives USDA’s 2018 Champions of Breakfast Award

USDA awarded Alhambra Unified School District (CA), the Western Region's 2018 Champions of Breakfast Award for the category, Implementation of an Innovative School Breakfast Model. This award recognizes schools and districts that operate exemplary school breakfast programs. Alhambra USD implemented a Grab N' Go Breakfast Model.

National School Breakfast Week Activities: Breakfast Samples, Active Living Prizes and More 

First Lady of Virginia Samples Grab N’Go Breakfast in Chesterfield County Public Schools

 Chesterfield first lady visit
 The First Lady of Virginia, Pamela Northam, preparing to sample breakfast on a Grab N' Go Kiosk at an elementary school in Chesterfield County Public Schools (Va.). Photo Credit: The Office of Governor Ralph Northam.

As part of National School Breakfast Week, Pamela Northam, The First Lady of Virginia, visited one of the elementary schools participating in AASA's alternative school breakfast initiative program in Chesterfield County Public Schools (VA). The elementary school offers Grab N' Go Breakfast with a kiosk in the hallway. Read more about this event.

An Array of Activities Celebrating Breakfast at Community Consolidated School District 21 (Ill.)

 WheelingNSBW2018
Community Consolidated School District 21 had a variety of activities to celebrate NSBW including Dress Up Days like crazy hat day and school spirit day. Students and staff wrote thank you notes to cafeteria staff, and principals at breakfast with their students. A principal was selected as a breakfast champion. Students who participated in breakfast that week won prices included scooters and swim passes.

Chef Tables Offer Opportunity to Sample School Breakfast at Stamford Public Schools (Conn.)  

Stamford Smoothies NSBW 2018

 Students sampled breakfast smoothies and oatmeal (flavors included apple pie and peaches and cream) at a chef table at an elementary and middle school in Stamford Public Schools (Conn.) during lunchtime. A dairy farmer from the New England Dairy Council visited the middle school to illustrate the importance of ensuring optimal nutrition for cows.  

AASA Also Got Out to Support Districts

New York State Press Event

On March 15th, Kayla Jackson presented at an event in Albany, NY which was held by The American Dairy Association North East. With the goal of highlighting Governor Cuomo's "No Student Goes Hungry" campaign, the event presented a "state of the state" on New York School Breakfast. Crystal FitzSimons from FRAC highlighted the great work that several NY districts had done on school breakfast, specifically calling out the success of school breakfast in Newburgh Enlarged City School District and Schenectady City School District. Jessica Pino-Goodspeed, a mentor from Hunger Solutions New York, shared findings from "Bridging The Gap: Ending Student Hunger with Breakfast After the Bell 2018 New York State School Breakfast Report."

Kelly Masline, Senior Associate Director of the New York State Council of School Superintendents was also in attendance.

AASA was invited to share the importance of superintendent support for breakfast as a crucial component for success and sustainability and to introduce two of our currently funded districts, Rochester City School District and Enlarged City School District of Middletown, both of whom shared the success of their school breakfast work.

 Yogurt Parfaits at Enlarged City School District of Middletown (NY) 

MiddletownSmoothies MiddletownKiosk
 During National School Breakfast Week, students in the Enlarged City School District of Middletown tried new Fruit -N- Yogurt Parfaits.

 

Join the Celebration: National School Breakfast Week!

(Alternative School Breakfast , National Awareness) Permanent link

Guest Post by: Alison Maurice , Child Nutrition Policy Analyst, Food Research and Action Center

 Why celebrate the 2018 National School Breakfast Week during March 5-9, 2018?

FRAC2018blog

School breakfast not only fights hunger and improves children’s nutrition, but is a vital tool for improving the academic achievement of your students

Tight family budgets and hectic morning schedules make eating breakfast before the school day difficult for too many families. The School Breakfast Program plays a critical role in ensuring your students receive the basic nutrition they need to start the school day ready to learn.

Studies show that students who eat breakfast at school, closer to class and test-taking time, perform better on standardized tests when compared to students that skip breakfast or eat breakfast at home. Additionally, children and adolescents who are experiencing hunger have poorer grades and slower memory recall . Participating in school breakfast allows students to focus on the tasks ahead of them, rather than their empty stomachs.

Hunger also can contribute to student behavioral problems . Research suggests that students who eat school breakfast are less likely to exhibit behavioral and psychological distress. They also have lower rates of absence and tardiness. Furthermore, schools that are providing school breakfast through after the bell programs, such as breakfast in the classroom , “grab and go,” and second chance breakfast , have observed fewer behavioral problems requiring disciplinary office referrals, allowing educators to spend more class time on curriculums.

The School Breakfast Program is an essential tool for ensuring that students have the nutrition needed to thrive academically, but school breakfast helps support health, too! Studies have found that children and adolescents who participate in school breakfast are less likely to be overweight and have more favorable weight outcomes such as a lower body max index (BMI, an indicator of excess body fat), while skipping breakfast has been associated with a higher risk of obesity in the short and long terms. School breakfast also reduces visits to the school nurse, especially in the morning.

The Food Research & Action Center (FRAC) recently released its annual School Breakfast Scorecard: School Year 2016–2017 , which further details the benefits of school breakfast, strategies for successfully increasing participation, and state and national participation rates in the program.

 Here are a few highlights from the report:

  • 12.2 million low-income children participated in the School Breakfast Program on a typical day in the 2016–2017 school year.
  •  56.7 low-income children participated in school breakfast for every 100 that participated in school lunch.
  •  Breakfast after the bell programs and those that offer free breakfast to all students increase low-income students’ participation in school breakfast.
  •  Community eligibility, the most recent federal option for high poverty schools to offer breakfast (and lunch) to all students for free with less administrative work, helped drive school breakfast participation.

While school breakfast participation continues to grow and reach more students than ever before, there are still millions of low-income children missing out on school breakfast. The 2018 National School Breakfast Week offers an important opportunity to celebrate the amazing benefits of school breakfast and to spread the word about successful strategies to increase participation.

Visit FRAC’s school breakfast page for more information and countless resources on the National School Breakfast Program.

Feeding Hungry Minds: Superintendent Leadership for Alternative School Breakfast Programs Request for Proposals

(Alternative School Breakfast , Student Support Services) Permanent link

 School Breakfast Logo

 AASA, The School Superintendents Association, has funding from the Walmart Foundation to support "Feeding Hungry Minds", the Association's alternative school breakfast program.

AASA will provide funding for infrastructure (e.g. kiosks, insulated bags and other equipment for school breakfast implementation), and other equipment and supply needs around school breakfast implementation.

AASA invites proposals from qualified school districts that possess the commitment, need, and capacity to participate in this alternative school breakfast initiative.

The deadline for submission of proposals is July 31, 2017.Send completed applications and questions to Kayla Jackson at kjackson@aasa.org.

The full application is below; please download all three documents.


 School Governance and Leadership Publication

 SGL SlideShow

 In preparation for your submission, you may also want to read our latest School Governance and Leadership, Feeding Hungry Minds: Stories From the Field, developed with support from the Walmart Foundation. It focuses on the impact of school breakfast by telling the stories of stakeholders including superintendents, food service directors, parents and students.

 

Do you want to offer school meals at no cost to all students?

(Alternative School Breakfast , National Awareness, Student Support Services) Permanent link

Guest Post by Alison Maurice, MSW, child nutrition policy analyst at the Food Research & Action Center.

FRAC will co-host a webinar with AASA and the National Rural Education Association on May 8th at 1pm EST on the Community Eligibility Provision. Learn more and Register.  
 

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Community Eligibility Provision is a powerful tool for high-need schools to provide breakfast and lunch at no charge to all students. Community eligibility reduces administrative paperwork for schools and increases school meal participation and benefits the entire community —students, families, school nutrition staff and administrators.

Why should I consider community eligibility for my school district? 

 FRACCEPPhoto

 Educators know that in order for children to learn, they must be well-nourished. Schools play an important role in ensuring students have access to healthy meals. That is why community eligibility continues to grow in popularity among high-need school districts. Community eligibility has been successful at increasing school breakfast and lunch participation, so more students experience the positive educational outcomes that are linked to participating in school meals. In the current school year, nearly 10 million children in over 20,000 schools and 3,500 school districts are being offered breakfast and lunch at no charge through the community eligibility program.

What are the benefits of community eligibility? 

 School districts participating in community eligibility benefit from: 

  •  less administrative work. School administrators no longer need to collect and verify school meal applications and can focus more resources on providing nutritious meals for students;
  •  increased participation in the school breakfast and lunch programs. In initial pilot states, community eligibility increased breakfast participation by 9.4 percent and increased lunch participation by 5.2 percent;
  •  improved financial viability of school nutrition programs. When community eligibility becomes available at a school, school meal participation increases, which can improve school nutrition finances; and
  •  the elimination of unpaid meal fees. This means schools no longer need to collect money from families or find available funds for the meals that go unpaid by students.

 Additionally, by offering meals at no charge to all students, community eligibility makes it easier for schools to leverage innovative school breakfast service models, such as breakfast in the classroom, “grab and go” breakfast, and second chance breakfast. Traditional school breakfast programs that operate before the school day begins must compete with hectic morning schedules and late bus arrivals. Rather, breakfast after the bell service models integrate breakfast into the school day, allowing more children to start the day ready to learn. 

How does community eligibility work? 

 Community eligibility allows high-need school districts and schools to offer breakfast and lunch at no charge to all students, while eliminating the school meal application process. Any school district, group of schools in a district, or individual school with 40 percent or more “identified students” — children who are certified for free meals without submitting a school meal application — can choose to participate in community eligibility.

Identified Students Include:

  • children who live in households that receive assistance from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly known as food stamps); Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF); or the Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations (FDPIR), and in some states, Medicaid benefits; and
  •  children who are homeless, migrant, enrolled in Head Start, or in foster care.

 How will my schools get reimbursed?

Once a school, group of schools, or school district establishes its identified student percentage (ISP), the ISP is multiplied by 1.6 to determine the percentage of meals reimbursed at the free reimbursement rate (capped at 100 percent). The remainder is reimbursed at the paid rate. This percentage is locked in for four years, unless the ISP goes up, in which case it would be adjusted to reflect the increase. The U.S. Department of Agriculture provides a “Community Eligibility Provision Estimator ” tool to help school districts determine if community eligibility makes financial sense. There is a lot of flexibility in how schools are grouped to determine the ISP, allowing districts to group schools to ensure financial viability.

 

Identified Student Percentage (ISP)

Meals Reimbursed at the Free Rate

Meals Reimbursed at the Paid Rate

40%

64%

36%

45%

72%

28%

50%

80%

20%

55%

88%

12%

60%

96%

4%

65%

100%

0%


 What can I do right now?

 Start planning for the 2017–2018 school year today. Find out which school districts and schools in your state have implemented community eligibility or were eligible during the 2016–2017 school year using FRAC’s Community Eligibility Database .

 Check out these resources to learn more about community eligibility:

 By adopting community eligibility, you can increase participation in school breakfast and lunch, ensuring your students the nutrition needed to succeed in school.

 Is there a deadline for my school district to apply for community eligibility?

On May 1, 2017, your state’s education agencies will publish a list of schools and school districts that qualify for community eligibility. Review the list to see which of your schools qualify for the 2017–2018 school year.

The deadline to apply to use community eligibility in the 2017–2018 school year is June 30, 2017.

 For more information on community eligibility, reach out to Alison Maurice , child nutrition policy analyst at the Food Research & Action Center .

Celebrating National School Breakfast Week 2017

(Alternative School Breakfast , National Awareness, Student Support Services) Permanent link

Since 2011, AASA has engaged 22 school districts in the Alternative School Breakfast Initiative, supported by the Walmart Foundation. This program increases the number of children who eat school breakfast, by taking breakfast out of the cafeteria and into the classroom and hallways through Breakfast in the Classroom, Grab ‘n’ Go, and Second Chance options.

These participating districts held activities over National School Breakfast Week, from March 6-10, to raise awareness of their school breakfast programs. Here are some shining examples:

School Administrators and Parents Engage in Meriden Public Schools

 MeridenAdminsNSBW2017

Meriden Public Schools hosted two elementary student and parent " School Breakfast Superhero" themed breakfast events, organized by their FoodCorp service member Lexi Brenner, during National School Breakfast Week to educate parents and students on the benefits of school breakfast and increase breakfast participation.

School and District Administrators, including Superintendent Dr. Mark D. Benigni , showed their support of school breakfast and were in attendance.

SuptMeridenSuptNBSW2017
Superintendent Dr. Mark D. Benigni, Meriden Public Schools, at a taste test activity.

The district’s three Registered Dietitians answered general health and nutrition questions and interacted with students and families. SNAP outreach efforts to increase CEP eligibility for more Meriden schools was also conducted. Students participated in the School Breakfast Week Challenge, tracking the amount of times they eat school breakfast with materials provided by the School Nutrition Association. Fun breakfast prizes were provided to each student daily when they ate breakfast during the week, in addition to breakfast "Lucky Tray" giveaways!

 Promotional Contests Popular Among Students in Two Large, Urban Districts 

San Diego Unified School District 

 SanDiegoNSBWmovieposter

San Diego had 12 of their  elementary schools participating in National School Breakfast Week promotion. Every student who ate breakfast every day of that week was entered into a drawing for a pair of movie tickets.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Spring Independent School District

Spring ISD continued their “Decorate Your Plate” promotion of National School Breakfast Week, which has become a hit in the district! Students decorate paper plates with their favorite breakfast foods and submit them for a chance to win a bike and helmet. The principals at each school select a winner. Below are a few of the student plates.

springisdnsbw2017pic1 springisdnsbw2017pic2

AASA Alternative School Breakfast Initiative districts lead New York State in breakfast participation

(Alternative School Breakfast) Permanent link

This guest post was written by Jessica Pino-Goodspeed, Child Nutrition Programs Specialist, Hunger Solutions New York.

 March2017HungerSolutionsReport

 It’s National School Breakfast week, and each year, Hunger Solutions New York celebrates the occasion with the release of its statewide report on school breakfast participation. Our latest report, School Breakfast: Reducing Child Hunger, Bolstering Student Success, reveals that the two New York State school districts in AASA’s Alternative School Breakfast Initiative, Hempstead Union Free School District (UFSD) and Newburgh Enlarged City School District, led the state in reaching low- income students with breakfast during the 2015-2016 school year.  

One in five New York State children face hunger every day. Children who arrive at school hungry have their mind on their empty stomach rather than on school work. More than 60 percent of New York State public school students live in households with income below or near the poverty level. Those families depend on free and reduced-price school meals to stretch limited monthly grocery budgets.

School breakfast provides students with a vital nutritional and educational support, during a crucial period of growth, development and learning, but our report shows the School Breakfast Program is greatly underutilized in New York State. While statewide school breakfast participation has increased since the 2014-2015 school year, growth in the number of students qualified to receive free or reduced-price breakfast has offset participation growth. In the 2015-2016 school year, fewer than one in three students who qualified to eat free or reduced-price breakfast participated in the School Breakfast Program.

New York State is among the lowest-performing states in reaching low-income National School Lunch Program participants with the School Breakfast Program. The state was ranked 42nd in the Food Research and Action Center’s School Breakfast Scorecard for the 2015-2016 school year.

With statewide breakfast participation lagging, Hempstead UFSD and Newburgh Enlarged City School District are examples for school breakfast best practices. Both districts have implement alternative school breakfast service models like breakfast in the classroom, grab and go, and second chance options, and provide free breakfast to all students, to optimize breakfast access. Together, Newburgh and Hempstead accounted for a quarter of the statewide growth in School Breakfast Program participation during the 2015-2016 school year, with increases of 67% and 133%, respectively.

 When students do not eat school breakfast, not only do they miss out on learning and health benefits, but also a significant amount of federal funding is left on the table. In the 2015-2016 school year, only 45.88% of free and reduced-price lunch participants also ate school breakfast. This resulted in the forfeiture of more than $71 million in federal reimbursements in that school year alone.

Ensuring New York State’s most vulnerable students have access to school breakfast requires simultaneous efforts at federal, state, and local levels. It is important to recognize that school breakfast can help to remove hunger as an obstacle to learning. When properly leveraged, the School Breakfast Program can be a fundamental building block for student health and academic success. To this end, schools, federal and state agencies, and elected officials should prioritize systemic changes to improve school breakfast participation. The report released today outlines specific methods to achieve that goal.

 Hunger Solutions New York works to ensure every public school student has access to school breakfast. Our organization provides school districts with tools, resources and one-on-one support to help maximize the SBP’s reach and to help ensure every student starts the school day free from hunger, properly nourished and prepared for a day of learning. Learn more at SchoolMealsHubNY.org.

Starting the School Day Ready to Learn with School Breakfast

(Alternative School Breakfast , National Awareness) Permanent link

 CP OTR School Breakfast

  Educators and administrators know how hunger affects children in and out of the classroom. Starting the school day ready to learn — with a healthy school breakfast — is the first step toward academic success. 

 Since 2011, AASA has engaged 22 school districts in the Alternative School Breakfast Initiative, supported by the Walmart Foundation. This program increases the number of children who eat school breakfast, by taking breakfast out of the cafeteria and into the classroom and hallways through Breakfast in the Classroom, Grab ‘n’ Go, and Second Chance options.

AASA is part of the Breakfast for Learning Education Alliance and works with Food Research & Action Center (FRAC), to increase participation in the national School Breakfast Program.

 
According to FRAC, Children who participate in the school breakfast program show improved attendance, behavior, and standardized achievement test scores as well as decreased tardiness and fewer visits to the school nurse .

While there is a clear link between breakfast and learning, FRAC’s new school breakfast reports shine a light on the fact that still too many children are missing out on the benefits of school breakfast. FRAC’s School Breakfast Scorecard found that only 56 low-income students participated in school breakfast for every 100 who ate school lunch in the 2015—2016 school year. Participation varies by state; for example, schools in West Virginia reach over 80 low-income students with school breakfast for every 100 participating in school lunch, while Utah schools reach less than 40 low-income students.

FRAC’s companion report, School Breakfast: Making it Work in Large School Districts, shows that some school districts across the country are meeting the needs of their low-income students by making breakfast readily accessible.  

The good news is that there are proven strategies to increase school breakfast participation. More schools are adopting breakfast after the bell models where breakfast is served in the classroom, from grab-and-go carts in the hallway on the way to class, or during a morning break after homeroom or first period. Schools that have adopted these models are seeing participation grow as a result.

padilla SGL
Roberto Padilla, Superintendent of Newburgh Enlarged City School District presenting at a conference on his district's Alternative School Breakfast Program.

 

 Two of AASA’s current participating districts, Newburgh Enlarged City School District (NY) and Newark Public Schools (NJ) were featured in this report as one of the few school districts that met the ambitious goal of 70 low-income students participating in the school breakfast program per 100 participating in the lunch program.

  So how can superintendents and administrators ensure that students have the chance to start the day with a healthy breakfast?

 If you are attending the National Conference on Education in New Orleans this March, join AASA Children’s Programs Department  and superintendents  at the "Feeding Hungry Minds: Funding Your School Breakfast Program" panel  to discuss strategies and learn how your district can become involved. The panel will take place on Thursday March 2nd at 2:45 pm in Room 211, at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center. 

When you're back in your district:

  •  Ask your school nutrition director for breakfast participation rates for all the schools in the district and provide this information to principals;
  •  Work with your school nutrition director, principals, and school board to develop a plan to implement breakfast in the classroom;
  •  Provide leadership to guide the process of implementing breakfast in the classroom and ensure all the necessary stakeholders—school nutrition staff, principals, teachers, and custodial staff—are on board and engaged; and
  •  Check FRAC’s database of schools eligible to offer free breakfast and lunch to all students through the Community Eligibility Provision, and discuss how to implement in eligible schools with your school nutrition director.

You also can sign up for FRAC’s monthly newsletter, Meals Matter: School Breakfast, to get further information and resources on school breakfast. Together, we can ensure every student starts their day ready to learn.

See AASA Children’s Programs Department’s School Breakfast webpage and resource library for more information about this initiative. http://www.aasa.org/SchoolBreakfast.aspx  

Join AASA Children's Programs Department at the 2017 AASA National Conference on Education

(Alternative School Breakfast , Children’s Health Insurance , Innovative Professional Development, National Awareness, Equity, Student Support Services, Community Schools , ESSA) Permanent link

 NCE2017Header

  Join AASA Children's Programs Department  in New Orleans at the 2017 National Conference on Education (NCE), this March!  

  Below is a schedule of concurrent sessions, Thought Leader sessions and  the Dr. Effie H. Jones Memorial Luncheon. 

 Click on the links below to see flyers with details on each of our sessions.

Register today at nce.aasa.org .

During the conference follow us on social media at @AASATotalChild and  using #NCE17 and read recaps of our sessions  in Conference Daily Online.

Schedule of Events

 Thursday March 2, 2017

9:00 am-10:00 am: Thought Leader: Redesigning Professional Development Systems Leadership, Feedback and Impact (Room 207)
9:00 am -10:00 am: Igniting and Insuring a STEAM K-16 Pipeline  (Room 211) 
12:15pm -1:00 pm: Knowledge Exchange Theater: Online Support for In-School Impact: #InsureAllChildren-- a demonstration of the AASA/ Children's Defense Fund school-based, child health insurance outreach and enrollment toolkit.(Exhibit Hall)

 Healthinsurancetoolkitheader
1:00 pm-2:00 pm: Dealing with Loss and Grief in School   (Room 211)
2:45 pm -3:45 pm: Feeding Hungry Minds: Funding Your School Breakfast Program (Room 211)
4:00 pm-5:00 pm: Thought Leader: Community Schools: Cultivating Opportunity, Equity and Agency (Room 207)

 Friday March 3, 2017
10:45 am -11:45 am:  Leveraging the Every Student Succeeds Act to Provide Integrated Student Supports (Room 211)
11:45 am -1:45 pm: The Dr. Effie H. Jones Memorial Luncheon with featured speaker, Monique W. Morris, author of Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools (Room 208)
2:45 pm-3:45 pm: Build a Culture of Equity in Your District (Room 211)

equityequality

 

  

We look forward to seeing you in New Orleans!

 

 

 


AASA Community of Practice Highlights the Impact of Alternative School Breakfast

(Alternative School Breakfast , Healthy Eating and Active Living , On The Road) Permanent link

 CoPSchoolBreakfastNOLA
The entire group for the Community of Practice at the end of the meeting in New Orleans.

 On October 19th and 20th, AASA, the School Superintendents Association, convened a Community of Practice for current and former Food Service Directors along with their mentors in New Orleans. A Community of Practice is more than a meeting, it’s an opportunity for participants to share best practices, brainstorm ideas to address challenges through case studies, and share stories on how the program has impacted their schools and community.

Mentors from state-level, anti-hunger community organizations, as well as food service directors from past cohorts, shared their expertise through interactive panel discussions. Everyone had a chance to network at a celebratory dinner in New Orleans, after spending the afternoon together.

Since 2011, with funding from the Walmart Foundation, AASA works with districts to increase school breakfast participation using alternative breakfast strategies like Grab N' Go and Breakfast in the Classroom. The current cohort of eleven school districts has been working with AASA since Spring 2015. AASA has funded 22 districts to do this work since 2011.

What Would You Do? Collaborative Case Studies  

 SBCoPinaction

 Following the welcome, introductions, and storytelling, participants were broken out into smaller groups to work on case studies. The case studies were inspired by focus groups that AASA conducted at four school districts currently participating in the initiative. Learn more about the focus groups from The Total Child

 In the case studies, groups developed plans on how to address hunger in their community, discussed how to approach the issue of food waste in their schools and developed a strategy on how to expand the breakfast program with parental support. They also considered different perspectives on healthy, less popular foods versus the more sugary foods like Pop tarts. One group developed their ideal alternative school breakfast program - if there were no limits with staffing or money. Participants were appreciative of this activity because it focused on issues that they face daily.

Insights and Advice from Past Food Service Directors and Mentors  

 PFSD Panel SBCOP
A panel of past food service directors.

 The Community of Practice featured two interactive panels: one featuring food service directors from past cohorts and another featuring mentor from statewide anti-hunger and dairy organizations.
The past food service directors panel focused on sustainability in terms of political support and communications. Key points included:

  •  Looking back, they were shocked on how much they needed the alternative school program.
  •  First and foremost, it’s important to consider what is best for children. Alternative School Breakfast has the potential to impact lives.
  •  If key stakeholders like superintendents and principals aren’t on board to have the program, historical data is important to show the importance of the school breakfast.
  •  Food service directors need to be connected to the superintendent, so that they are viewed as a key supporter of the school breakfast program.

 The mentors offered their expertise as state level advocates focused on anti-hunger and dairy initiatives. They discussed how food service directors can:

  •  Change the way they market school meals, and meals during summer and holiday breaks. For instance, take the word ‘free’ out of the marketing and instead say how it’s a complimentary meal.
  •  Change the dialogue of how school breakfast is discussed at the state level.
    •   Attend state association meetings with school system leaders
    •   Contribute to state level publications to show the impact of school breakfast, and
    •  Work with mentor organizations to connect with other school districts in your state to serve as a role model or learn from other districts on how they implement the program.
     
  •  Conduct a focus group with students to see what aspects of the program resonate with them.

 Stories from the Heart

Throughout the Community of Practice, current food service directors shared stories on the alternative school breakfast program through letters, videos, testimonials and parent surveys. Highlights included:  

  •  Chicago Public Schools and Newark Public Schools (NJ) had videos featuring students who made up their own songs on the impact of school breakfast.
  •  Spring Independent School District (TX) told one of their stories from the perspective of a favorite food item in Breakfast in the Classroom: little pancakes.
  •  In Newburgh Enlarged School District (NY), more than 50 parents filled out a survey which was promoted on social media and on the district’s website. Parents wrote of the impact that school breakfast had on their lives.
    •  One parent wrote: “I'll admit; I don't make the best food choices at times. I'm a full time student, with a deployed husband, and a newborn to care for. More often than not, by the end of my exhausting day, I'll give anything to my kindergartener just so we don't have to have a battle at the table. At least I know that she'll eat, and eat well when I don't have time to run to the supermarket for fresh fruits and veggies."

School district leaders discussed how they could use these stories to share with key stakeholders in their community like School Board members and how they could connect stories to the data collected relating to average daily participation and metrics relating to discipline and tardiness.

Community of Practice—More than a Meeting

 This Community of Practice was in part a celebration of the work that our 11 current participating districts have done over the past year and a half. It was also an opportunity for food service directors from past cohorts to reflect on how the program has evolved over the past five years. It was a chance for mentors to learn from school district leaders how they can best share their resources and expertise. By networking, sharing stories and problem solving through real life examples that occur on a daily basis, everyone went back to their district with new ideas on how to expand, sustain and improve their programs.